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, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too long, our presiding officer. anyway, senator merkley, i yield. mr. merkley: i think my colleague from new mexico is absolutely right in pointing out there were periods when the senate really worked to address the big issues facing america. and it wawnltd that there weren't -- wasn't that there weren't profound differences. there were fierce differences, emotional differences, deep differences but folks came to this floor, they conversed, they laid out their arguments and ultimately they made decisions about which way to go. and they didn't bring the attitude let's just paralyze this chamber from doing doing nothing. had they d
mouse gimmick to win elections without having to win with the most number of votes. rebel all of those cuts and the effort to make it harder for people to vote, all of that targeting to vote in ways that people don't like voting? well, now they're trying something new. they don't like states like pennsylvania that regularly vote democratic. so some kwauk thougquack thaugo to give the rural votes more power. their decided to kill the power of how the real state goes overall. if they can't get people to vote for them, they try to kill the power of those who don't. will they get away with it? not if you stay tuned and keep an eye on these little buggers. they've got their mickey mouse ears on. "politics nation" with al sharpton starts right now. >> thanks, chris. and thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, president obama won. this president has no time to waste and he's using it to push for change on gun control, on immigration, on climate change, on ending the ban on women serving in combat. he's got a full agenda. and it was on full display today. remember all of that bluster from
the parliamentary elections this week. will they satisfy protesters or inflame them? we'll get the king's reaction. then, the prime minister of r h russia dmitry medvedev. some call it a new cold war. who's to blame and will russia help in syria? we'll discuss it all. >>> also, the algerian hostage crisis that left dozens dead. is this a sign of a grave, new terror threat? i'll tell you my view. >>> but, first, here's my take. every year at davos people like me try to get a sense of the mood of the place. take the temperature of people in this frosty mountain resort. obviously, i will give you a highly impressionistic and personal picture, but one i find useful since davod does bring together leaders and government, business and media and even the ngo community from all corners of the world. it is genuinely global in a way that few conferences are. so, what is the mood? well, there's a sense of calm, a relief that many storms that seem like they might be overwhelming like the euro crisis have been weathered. people from america are optimistic. those from emerging markets more so, but everywhere t
's nominations today a perfect example of how elections have consequences? >> well, sitting where i'm sitting, not in the clint eastwood chair, i would say yes, it certainly does. it's a case of continuing a very tough policy of enforcement at the sec. so the president is sending a signal that at least in this area of regulation enforcement, he's not going to be backing down at all. surely, that's exactly what wall street and corporate america expected when he won that election. >> and that was the way he campaigned. in many ways, we're looking at, joan, him continuing the path that he campaign ds oed on, gots on and won. look at the poll on rights for gay people, 60%. on aid to the poor, 59%, on tax levels for millionaires and big corporation, 59%. women's issue, 55%. immigration, 55%. i mean, these are high numbers of people feeling the gop is out of touch on these issues. >> yeah, i mean, reverend al, the shocking thing is, as you just laid out, the support for democratic policies is even h h higher than support for democratic politicians. the president won a decisive victory, but the sup
justice, distinguished justices of the court, my fellow statewide elected officials, members of armed forces and national guard, members of the consular corps, governor christine gregoire, and my fellow washingtonians. this we know,our world is changing faster and more dramatically than ever before. once in a lifetime events now seem to happen with startling regularity. we've seen the greatest financial crisis since the great depression, natural disasters fueled by climate change, and unimaginable human tragedies like sandy hook elementary. technology, medicine, and the fundamental understanding of our universe. every day i am left in awe at how much we are able to achieve, and heartbroken over the uncertainty, we see opportunity. and we all feel a profound responsibility to our children and our grandchildren. we have a spirit of innovation here in washington that haswe are not done. [applause] a new world economy is emerging from the depths of this recession, and while its contours and relationships are not fully understood to us, we do know two things, one. with our uniquely powerfu
a barn burner of an election coming up tomorrow. i sure hope you make it though. and just one piece of advice as you start gearing up for this campaign. i don't think you need to use that whole or cathing for that voter turnout tomorrow. i'm just having a little fun. just starting the night with a little fun. on a serious and sincere note i want to say on bhave of myself and other republican governors, i want to thank the chairman for his leadership at the r.n.c. >> as a point of personal privilege i want to thank the members from my home state of louisiana. roger has been a great partner. let's absolutely give him a round of applause. [applause] . we also have our national committee woman who does a phenomenal job representing our state as well. >> and ross little, when i sat down i said ross you are no long ter most attractive committee person from louisiana. but does a great job. >> let me tell you in advance. i plan to talk about the big picture tonight and i may say some things that may challenge your asuppingses. you may agree or not agree and that's okay. ours is a party that
elections in a row, there is certainly time for some candid and honest discussion with our party. the first concept want to talk about is simply this -- america is not the federal government. [applause] take time to let that thought releasing in. america is not the federal government. in fact, america is not much about government at all. america's government is one of those things that you have to have but you sure don't want to much of it. it is like your family visiting over the holidays. i've got to be careful, my wife is here. this is the polar opposite of the political debate in our country today we've got one party that wants to be in charge of the federal government's of they can expand and another party that wants to be in charge of the federal government so they can get it under control. i am here to tell you that as a terrible debate. it is a debate fought entirely on our opponents terms, a debate about which party can better manage the federal government is a small and shortsighted debate. if our vision is not bigger than that, we simply don't deserve to win. our public discourse
. president obama emboldened by his re-election has already drawn his so-called line in the sand. now republicans have to come to the proverbial table. perhaps the most powerful republican in washington, eric cantor, says he and his fellow republicans will have a plan and they are ready to deal. >> i think it's important that we be here as members of the u.s. congress. there are six of us who are here. really interested in the discussion about the global economy. obviously, the u.s. economy is still a global leader. we want it to remain that way. the political debate at home has been very much about jobs and the economy. and we're here listening to some of the leaders of the eu and other entities here trying to understand how they're dealing with their problems. and i think coming out of all this will be a renewed sense that in america we can compete and we will compete and we will continue to be the destination for capital and innovation. >> and we've got a natural gas boom, an oil boom, we've got thanks to low interest rates what appears to be some sort of a housing boom. so much mo
, there was an election last year. it did not go our way. like you, i understand full well that elections have consequences. the vice president off house is a few houses away from here. i was looking forward to taking on the big challenges. there are two ways to define defeat -- you can deny it or you can choose to learn from it. i choose to learn from it. the way that i see it, our defeat is all the more reason to lay out our vision and lay out specifics with a broader appeal. it will be difficult without a arner in the white house. -- without a partner in the white house. i believe that we can do this. we have to deal with the fact that president obama has a second term. that is the topic of my talk today. a second term will present a lot of new challenges for our side. it will also present a lot of opportunities. we will need something that we occasionally overlook. i would like to explain what that is and why we need it. first, a context. worst term,dent's we argued against big government in theory -- in his first term, we argued against big government in theory. obamacare is no longer a 2
that they're willing to work with this president? now that he has won two elections, and clearly the last one? >> you know, i hope so. we talk off camera -- >> you don't sound confident. >> well, here is the thing there are a lot of good folks in the republican caucus. i want to say that. and i mean that. but once they start voting, will they vote their conscience or will they vote what the tea party extremists demand. and that is the question. that's a question they have to answer. now some of their leaders said we're going to give -- we're going to take him out. our key agenda is to take out obama and make him a one-term president. they failed. i hope enough republicans are out there to do what is right now. >> congressman, four years ago tonight, there were a group of republicans that met at a restaurant. >> yes, there was. >> that set the course of obstruction. and they said we're going to say no to everything. what kind of dinner are they going to have tonight? >> is crow on the menu? >> i said that earlier today in our broadcast. they should probably be serving that today. but the p
concern. i want to play something that ted cruz, newly elected texas senator, republican, had to say this weekend, about gun control. and let's come back and talk about it. >> you know, there actually isn't the so-called gun show loophole, that doesn't exist. any licensed firearm dealer that else at a gun show has to have a background check. what it doesn't apply to is personal sales, one on one. and that's true whether it's at a gun show or -- >> i would point out, the key there is a licensed firearm dealer. some of these people, you can sort of apply as a, you know, you sell at a gun show occasionally, that's the gun show loophole. but, ted cruz gets to speak for lots and lots of people. how do you navigate, whether it's in delaware or nationally with what your father is trying to do, how do you navigate the politics of this? there's a reason the assault weapons ban sunseted in '04, because the politics of it simply didn't sustain. there's a reason barack obama didn't talk all that much about it in 2008. how do you keep the momentum to do something? >> the facts are important. sena
of the tea party caucus. the president won an election that many say he shouldn't have won given the sluggish recovery. he beat your party. democrats beat a bit more in the senate. do you feel republicans need to change in the second obama term? >> i think a few of them are, john, and i'm certainly not. those of us who won an election, we see our constituents as deserving the best representation we can give them. we won elections too. this is an interesting day today, this peaceful transfer, a constitutional way of the power and vision by our founding fathers, and they understood the separation of powers. they knew there was going to be a clash in the confrontation and a struggle between the parties, but we also know we have to run this government. it's going to be interesting as this unfolds. this should be a healing day. then tomorrow morning, we can start that harder work you mentioned. >> reporter: let's talk about the harder work. some of it divides your party internally. other parts divide his party internally. there's been a talk that maybe immigration reform is a place there could be
on what happened to them in the last election. gun control. more republicans backing things like background checks, they stand a good chance of getting stuff done in the next year, while the president has the leverage on his side. >> okay. let's look at another couple of challenges for you, ed. sequestration, that starts march 1st. debt ceiling suspension expiring on may 19th. you think the president's policy goals will get bogged down because of these upcoming deadlines? >> that's an interesting question. we are trying to sort that one out. this punt into may, with the debt ceiling suggests that it buys everyone time on fiscal issues and might allow congress to turn its attention to immigration and gun control and other issues. certainly, the fiscal debate isn't going anywhere. a big question, will sequestration indeed happen if it does happen, does it happen assith currently written, do we make changes or the white house come up with a way to stave it off and get republicans and democrats to agree? a big push under way to get started on gun control, immigration, hearings next w
from the election, he speak out as the vice presidential nominee saying moving forward the gop needs to lay out its vision with even more specifics and with a broader appeal. >>> meanwhile, the nation's capital today there was a powerful unprecedented show of public sentiment in gun control. the million mom march brought together thousands from all over the country including 100 people from newtown, connecticut. parents, pastors and gun violence survivors calling for action in the wake of the murders at sandy hook element y elementary. >> this time we, the people, will act. we're stepping up and this time we will not step back! >> and what it's counting on is for us to get the newtowns, for us to forget the virginia techs. >> the march comes one day after vice president joe biden held a roundtable talk about gun control in virginia. kristen welker is at the white house and joins me now. when can we expect the president thoims ta himself to take the gun control debate on the road? >> reporter: i think you can expect president obama to hit the road and talk about gun control in the ne
to put it aside and not talk about it in the election and here we are, back with his promise and what was more interesting, too, not only did he make that promise, but you had somebody like barbara boxer, whose the senator from california, big climate person, she gave some details, too, how they intend to pursue this, normally through the epa for a carbon regulation program and thinking of putting in place a carbon tax. >> paul: oh, well, we'll talk a little about that. steve, so is this really a regulatory agenda? i don't think that cap and trade, the old program can pass even a democratic senate. it couldn't the first time when they controlled everything. >> yeah, there's a reason that president obama almost never mentioned the words climate change and cap and trade during the the campaign, paul, because they're political losers, they're big tax increases on workers, on union workers, on manufacturing workers, and so, the democrats have avoided that issue now that they've won this election, they've sort of sprung it on people and i don't believe the votes are there in the united sta
. how are elected officials going to take the leadership that is necessary to do that? they have to hear from their constituents. we have to do the training of adults. we have to mobilize them. we have to engage them. we need them to share their experiences with the elected officials and congretional folks. without that engagement, that mobilization, we see so many pieces of legislation dying. >> i wonder, as much as we have to mobilize here, i want to focus on the fact this is an international problem. if you are spewing carbons in new jersey, they cross the border into canada. how do we begin to think of an international focus here? >> it's been a problem for a long time. the u.s. is consuming more than our population. it's affected the rest of the world. now we have problems like india and china are consuming based on an american model. they want what we want and they want to do it the way we did it. that means that you can't have any sort of climate agreement without everyone coming to the table. republicans used that as an excuse to do nothing. china is doing nothing -- no, it doesn
about whether or not you're in favor of term limits for all elected officials. termresident already has limits. your governors, senators, mayors, city council, dog catcher, tax collector. are you in favor of term limits, yes or no? here are the numbers. host: you can also reach out to us by social media. host: i want to show you some of the numbers from the recently released gallup poll. they ask americans support for establishing term limits for federal lawmakers. suppose on election day you could vote for key issues as well as candidates. or againstote for the number of terms congress and senate can serve? nationally among adults those voting for term limits are in the 75% range. those who say they would vote against term limits, 21%. those who had no opinion, 5%. breaking it down among political parties, republicans, those voting for, who say they would vote for term limits, 82% of republicans questioned in this gallup poll, 82% say they would vote for term limits. 15% say they would vote against. 3% say they have no opinion. independence, 79% say they would vote for term limits. 17%
: the governor has really had the popularity ratings that have stalled ever since he has been elected into office. one of the latest things he has been doing is after his first term in which he spent some time really cutting the budget and balancing the budget, and that included reducing the education funding by $1.3 billion, he has turned a run and is now in the process of trying to win back some of his support, especially within the education community. he has recently come up with a proposal to get every full-time teacher in the state a $2,500 raise. that is one of the things he has been doing that is really going across the party line a little bit to try to reach out to teachers. host: how does florida have the money to pay for that? is there any push back? caller: the cost is estimated at $480 million. the governor has yet to give us his budget proposal. he will be releasing that this week. we will see where he plans to pay for it. there has been some push back from the legislature. republican lawmakers say that they do not oppose giving teachers a raise, but they would prefer to have focuse
inaugurated four days ago. >> right. >> and you're talking about elections four years from now. >> yeah, and i am, as you know, steve, i am still secretary of state so i am out of politics an i'm forbidden from even hearing these questions. >> as steve martin would tay mussily say, excuse me. they asked to come on "60 minutes." they like the press coverage they got today and last night. they love the fact we're talking about it. it seems to me for him to mock the very message when they are the message is a little weird on the part of the president. >> please, steve. did you see the body language on hillary. that's a woman who knows the presidency is basically hers for the taking if she wants it. who could stop her? she knows it. she's as relaxed as i have ever seen her. the best thing to do is step back, get out of this job, and spend the next three years preparing herself to run for president if she wants it. >> was this a move -- so many things in politics follow other things that wouldn't have happened if they didn't have that thing before them. do you think this was to give her a really ni
ryan sat down for his first talk show appearance since the election. the congressman told david gregory that it is premature to talk about whether he will run for president in 2016. >> i represent wisconsin and i am chairman of the budget committee. i think i can do my job representing the people i work for by focusing on that right now than focusing on these distant things. >>> a new anti-chuck hagel ad has popped up. the ad is from a conservative group called americans for strong defense. at least five other groups from the right and left are a organizing to block hagel's nomination. the president out on tuesday. republican congressman paul ryan said both parties are waiting on the president. >> the question many of us are asking, is he looking to play politics or does he want to solve the problem? we don't know the answer to that yet. we know there are a late of democrats in kwg who want to solve this problem, fix this mess and many of us agree with that. >> white house correspondent peter alexander joining me live. on tuesday can we expect to hear from the president about actual leg
have that very long, hard, primary campaign. in politics and in democracy, sometimes you win elections, sometimes you lose elections. and i worked very hard, but i lost. and then president obama asked me to be secretary of state. and i said yes. and why did he ask me and why did i say yes? because we both love our country. >> let me bring in political reporter for "u.s. news and world report" lauren fox and white house reporter david nakimura. david the first sit down interview the president has done with anyone other than the first lady. why do this? why do it now? >> i think t.j. the timing is secretary of state has served for four years. now she's leaving. she's had a bit of a tough run lately with her personal health and the situation in benghazi where the consulate came under attack. four diplomats were killed. she was in a hearing just last week. i think the president wanted to sit down and show a real thanks first of all and a show of support as she leaves. it will be interesting obviously as speculation comes in a couple of years whether she'll run for president against possibl
has his eye towards the general election, that he does not see his advantage in being as obstructionist as he was the last two years. he has an obvious advantage in kentucky. it is a red state. it is possible that there could be a democrat that could come up, if there is too much frustration. he is the senate, as much as harry reid is, because he is a party leader. congress's approval rating is in the single digits. that is not exactly something you want when you're going before voters. the more he can look reasonable, the better he looks. host: ryan grim, explaining some of the changes to the filibuster rule. he is the washington bureau chief for the -- for "the huffington post." back to your calls -- we're focusing on the pentagon lifting the ban on combat roles for women. on twitter -- from our facebook page -- tracey says -- sac joins us from philadelphia, good morning, on the democrats' line. -- zach joins us from philadelphia, good morning, on the democrats' line. caller: when we look at the labor market, allowing men and women to serve together, it will have hug
have real challenges. and we did get whipped in the presidential election. and that's not something that we take lightly. >> but so far, there is no consensus about how to fix them. republican national committee chairman, reince priebus, is expected to be re-elected today, after quietly making nice with ron paul supporters and heading off any challenge to his leadership. he'll call for a, quote, republican renewal, in a speech this afternoon. but the rnc committee drafting the plan for change is made up of party insiders, rather than anyone who's likely to break china. meanwhile, republican governors are griping privately and publicly that the gop in washington is doing nothing to help the republican brand, after being schooled by new jersey governor chris christie. washington republicans got a talking-to last night from louisiana governor, bobby jindal, who said the gop has to stop being a stupid party and talk like adults. >> today's conservatism is completely wrapped up in solving the hideous mess that is the federal budget. we have seemed to have an obsession with government boo
their coverage of newtown with one of john barrow's election ads. that ad was also repugnant. >> absolutely. it absolutely is. extremes are always their own side's worst enemy. i don't think there's any comparison, the nra to this organization. but just reality check here. barrow is one of the few remaining blue dog democrats left in the south. he's an endangered species. the fact that he's being targeted by a liberal group for running an ad trying to say he's strong second amendment doesn't make sense. it reminds me an old line lyndon johnson used to use. what's the difference between liberals and the cannibals? cannibals only eat their friends and family members. so i don't think this ad is particularly helpful. >> very funny. perhaps true because it hits close to the mark. hogan, what about this, why can't the head of the nra just apologize and just, you know -- why is he standing by that ad? it makes him look bad. >> it does. look, i said this, i've said this many times, if the nra had used this type of language and said something like, look, we are about responsible gun ownership in th
, working to desegregate the deep south. >> the fact that obama could be elected again shows that the stone of hope, it came out of the mountain of despair that king spoke of and there is hope. >> reporter: a sentiment likely shared by so many on the mall today, including the man they all came to see. cecilia vega, abc news, washington. >>> and here again, george stephanopoulos, great to spend the day with you. so, did anything happen today that changed the political possibilities? >> i don't think so. one day, one speech cannot dot that. even though this is the day where all of america comes together, and that was one of the big themes of the president's speech. but one of the things i did think we saw today was a very changed president. and this is a very different time and a very different president from the one who took office four years ago. the speech four years ago, a dark speech. for a dark time. we were mired in crisis. the economy beginning to come back. and what you saw today is, the president gave a meditation on freedom and equality. it was a president who else felt free. >> an
in the november election. republican members are hunkered down at the annual winter meeting in north carolina. they reelected the committee chairman. the talk is extremely harsh at times with one prominent republican leader using the word stupid to describe the way he said the party has been behaving. let's bring in the political director on the scene for us. he is joining us with the latest information. pretty harsh words over there. >> yeah, there is. look, wolf, the republicans have come to grips with the results of the election. they did not win back the white house. they lost in the house of representatives and of course democrats remained in control of the united states senate. a lot of soul searching over the past couple of days for members of the republican national committee. these are the grass roots activists who come all across the country who make up the republican party. as you said, harsh words from the louisiana governor, bobby jindal who had to say this last night. >> we have got to stop being stupid. it's time for a new republican party that talks like it does. articulate ou
day one after the election. i think they're ready to come out with something. i think you're going to see that marco rubio has laid a lot of the groundwork by selling these principles. he's gotten great endorsement and support from some of the most right-winged pundit makers. now it's time to act upon it and grow it from there but it is basically the only thing happening in congress today where there is a bipartisan movement on both -- in both chambers and both sides of the aisle. >> but, ana, i've been hear about about marco rubio and the gang of six. why haven't we heard from them? >> timing is everything. you know what, don lemon? i wouldn't put money on them waiting on the president. the president's going to speak on tuesday. i wouldn't be surprised if these senators who are tremendously strategic and know how to play the political game and defend third bipartisan process, i wouldn't be surprised if they preempt the president, do it tomorrow, do it before the president does on tuesday. these are not folks that wait on the president. these folks act. >> so you think they may com
in the last election to republicans. particularly mitt romney with the latino voters. he lost big time. and that's why when i asked senator mccain and others who were standing right here where i'm standing, half a dozen years ago, why this is different, that's why they answered that way. listen to this. senator kennedy stood with you and, senator mccain, you were standing with him, and he said 2007 is the year we must fix our broken system. we must strike while the iron is hot. what makes you think, why is this year different? >> elections. elections. >> the republican party is losing the support of our hispanic citizens. and we realize that there are many issues in which we thing we're in agreement with our hispanic sit steps but this is a preeminent issue for those citizens. >> wolf, it's important to underscore that we really did see some of the people who have been here before, with senator kennedy and others half a dozen years ago, but some newborn faces like marco rubio who of course is an up and coming conservative who has made this issue one of his own, because of the fact that
, you know, president obama is now won election twice with over 5%, 50% of the vote, which is, you know, he is, he and joe biden, those only two offices everybody votes for. and he has won. he got over 50%. so he will make his case. i think what is different, what is significantly different, there will be confrontation but i think the first time you're seeing the president move hess campaign organization, we just saw this in the last few days, move it into advocacy on the issues for his agenda during the second term. that's unprecedented. no president's ever been able it do that. and this time it is not with some rinky-dink campaign organization that we've seen in the past. this is the biggest campaign organization ever seen in the united states. 28, 30 million people. those people making the case to their members of congress regardless of party, whether the member is democrat or republican. i think could change the way we look at a lame duck second term presidency because of the power of that grassroots organization. bill: wow! that's a big statement, joe. back to the initial question
that got him e re-elected and the way he paid tribute today. >> he came up late in the civil rights movement and always said that he regretted that. this is what he finally proclaimed with such passion today. you can look at his life and doctor king and the rise of civil rights in a very personal way. the day barack obama was born, four civil rights workers were arrested in louisiana. on august 4th, the civil rights act was passed by the senate. so there's so much history that was sort of, you could see it in his face today, i think in a more profound way than even is first inaugural. >> well, he comes from an unusual background. he comes from an imgrant mother who left the scene, white mother, middle american mother raised in hawaii and raised again in indonesia. >> so he had to construct an identity where he discovered, constructed, i think, because it was a deliberate process. he wrote about it in dreams for my father, his first book, it's been written about by others. and the identity that he constructed is an african american man. he went into the community in chicago, he -- yo
of it is to rebuild the middle class. i just don't see any social policies on the horizon -- the election is over. we have heard everything the candidates had to say. not one said anything intelligent about, this is how you rebuild the american middle class. so, little tiny book. not all that think. tells three stories. what doesn't work, and why it doesn't work, what does work, and why it does work, what could work and how to make it work. >> host: professor gelles, do you come at this from a liberal or conservative point of view? you mentioned fox news. >> guest: practical. i've worked in policy in washington. i've been a dean of the school of social policy. and i find that purple is my color. i'm not interested in taking an ideological point of view. i'm interest in results. and the danger of writing a book like this is -- i've already discovered it -- my extremely liberal friend wish i had never written the book and my extremely conservative friends which i didn't want to spend this much of the government money. if i can tick both sides off and be true to the data, then i've done the book i wante
's debt. joining me now to debate those issues, chuck schumer of new york and newly elected republican senator ted cruz of texas. welcome back as senator cruz to "meet the press." back to both of you. i want to start on the gun debate. because as i say, even before the second term is officially underway thissy is bait is well underway. here are the highlights of what the president wants to accomplish. universal background checks. he'd like to pursue a ban on high capacity magazines. an assault weapons ban that lapsed in 2004. and he'd like stricter laws on gun trafficking. but senator schumer, just as i challenged wayne lapierre of the nra very hard when this came up, i challenge you as well with a question of, is this really going to make a difference? and rich lawry wrote something that caught my attention in "the national review." no one can write a law against mothers owning guns that one day might be turned against them by deranged sons who then commit horrific acts of murder-suicide. shooting rampages are hard to prevent because they are so often committed by young men with no cr
that harry reid almost didn't win re-election. >> they need to change the intensity to get people who support gun control to actually start voting, to have them care enough about it that they will actually vote on it. >> considering joe biden, susan, has been leading the charge on gun control, i want to play one more clip from his google chat. he was asked if an assault weapons ban would -- >> a shotgun will keep you a lot safer. a double barrel shotgun than the assault weapons in somebody's hands who doesn't know how to use it. even one who does know how to use it. you know. it's harder to use an assault weapon and hit something than it is a shotgun. you want to keep people away in an earthquake, buy some shotgun shells. >> this seems to be part of the strategy. sort of common sense. also things like we've heard supporters say you don't need an assault rifle to shoot a duck. you need 30 shots from a magazine to kill a deer you probably shouldn't be out there hunting. what's the messaging and how important is the messaging? >> the messaging is important and we certainly see vice president bid
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